Writer’s Quote Wednesday : Mitch Albom

Do you have a go to cafe when you want to feel you belong somewhere?

Or a friend you can always turn to when you need an ear to listen or a shoulder to lean to?

I have both and I have a go to book … I always have my Mitch Albom collection that I can always turn to when I need to be knocked back to reality when I feel that life is unfair or I feel lost because I don’t get what I want or to where I want to go.

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Which ever title I could get my hands to it always seems to be the right one that helps me see a different perspective of the rut I maybe into and there’s always a feel good after taste to it. His stories are simply told, relatable and practical that is why I find it easy to re-read as needed.

Mitch Abloom

Here’s one quote from The Timekeeper book  that resonates to what many of us.

How much time do we have left?

In the kind of world we are living in, taking it slow means not getting there fast or being there early we regret we could have prepared more.  There is always an element of time that either we regret we lost them or we wish we have more.

Having been off the rat race for a while I now learn to appreciate what I have in my hands — time, to be with my family, to discover what I really want to know, to meet new friends and more. It centers me to know what is really important now while trying to reconcile with my regret from the past and to wait for what the future brings.

Listen to The Timekeeper and let it transport you to what is important and let you be reminded to value every moment of every day.

Who is Mitch Albom? 

Mitch Albom and wife Janine

He’s an internationally renowned and best-selling author, journalist, screenwriter, playwright, radio and television broadcaster and musician. His books have collectively sold more than 35 million copies worldwide

Born on May 23, 1958 in Passaic, New Jersey

Education and Passion : He earned a bachelor’s degree in 1979 at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, majoring in sociology, but stayed true to his dream of a life in music, and upon graduation, he worked for several years as a performer, both in Europe and America. In his early 20’s, while living in New York, he took an interest in journalism and volunteered to work for a local weekly paper, the Queens Tribune. He eventually returned to graduate school, earning a Master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, followed by an MBA from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business. During this time, he paid his tuition partly through work as a piano player.

Mitch eventually turned full-time to his writing, working as a freelance sports journalist in New York for publications such as Sports Illustrated, GEO, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. His first full time newspaper job was as a feature writer and eventual sports columnist for The Fort Lauderdale News and Sun Sentinel in Florida.

Marriage and First Book : In 1995, he married Janine Sabino. That same year he re-encountered Morrie Schwartz, a former college professor who was dying of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. His visits with Schwartz would lead to the book Tuesdays with Morrie, which moved Mitch away from sports and began his career as an internationally recognized author.

More information about his life and his writing at http://www.mitchalbom.com 


Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Have a great day!

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Writer’s Quote Wednesday : Sue Monk Kidd

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How many of you have seen the movie Secret Life of Bees?

It’s a period movie adapted by Gina Prince-Bythewood based on the book of the same title by the author Sue Monk Kidd. Set in the time of separation of colored against white Americans. Where owning a colored servant was a status symbol of landed masters.

It is a story about a lost girl finding life, love and courage in a family of colored women who in the past had given the same love to the main character Lily mother when she too was lost. The family that adopted her sells honey and in spite of them being colored they are respected by the community and can stand on their own – does not bow down to any master.

As a young girl meeting a young boy for the first time sparked an emotion she was not aware of but as in the quotation — the love they have for each other cannot happen because they are different. It was a start of self discovery for young Lily about her past, her emotions and her future as one of the sisters taking care and learning from the bees.

At present, the story may resonate so much to the reality of life in a different context.  There still remains indifference and discrimination between people of color, about religion and ethnicity, evident with the news around the world which results to violence to the point of killing mercilessly.

Maybe watching the story can give young people more insight on life, love and tolerance and also about standing up to what you believe without radicalizing your own ideologies. We live in an infinite world — what goes around comes around, therefore we should learn to live in a world where diversity and differences are the norm.

About the author:

Sue Monk KiddI was re-introduced to Sue Monk Kidd when I spent time with my sister last year. I watched the movie and read Secret Life of Bees not so long ago while on a mission but I didn’t bother to look her up or her books until that week-long retreat I did before the holidays.

Her book When the Heart Waits is one of the book I read and guide in my spiritual journey.  I recommend it to those who also seek guidance towards spirituality or just to learn more about the virtue of waiting.

To read more about her check this site http://suemonkkidd.com/author/

For her books http://suemonkkidd.com/books/

Reviews for her novel and the movie Secret Life of Bees (and rating by Roger Ebert)


Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Have a great day!

 

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Roald Dahl

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In the bible it says “Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven” (Mat. 18) and like the quote by Roald Dahl it tells us that unless we see the world like a child – with innocence in seeing the world with glittering eyes we will never appreciate the beauty of where we are now in spite of all the troubles in the world, still there are more good around us, we just need to know how and where to look.

Many may disagree with me but this world, this life, is the kingdom God had promised. This is the dream life that is so elusive for many because maybe we are looking at it from a different angle, different perspective, different eyes.  We don’t see it because of the many webs we have to clear away in front of us,  that blocks us in appreciating the life we have and or to have the courage to dream of what it could be.

We tend to also forget to appreciate the small things that we encounter everyday. We take a lot of things for granted. We are too busy.  When we get the chance sometimes it’s too late — the value, the meaning and the magic is gone.

We should never loose that innocence when dealing with the world around us, with our life, with others. There are still many things around us that is worth more than what you have now that only need to be acknowledge. There are still more for all of us if only we know what we are looking for.

Let us not loose the child within us and be matured enough to appreciate that not everything has a price. Happiness is free for start.

Don’t loose that “inner child” in you.  And of course keep on dreaming.

Who is Roald Dahl? 

Roald Dahl with his dogs

Roald Dahl is synonymous to children’s books that were made into movies for everyone to watch and enjoy, though I know he had some adult books in the early part of his writing career. But I remember him from the favorite children books and  movies I love as a child (and young adult) – Charlie and The Chocolate Factory, The Witches, James and the Giant Peach  and Matilda which our little Andrae can’t get enough of and many more.


Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Glad to be back!

Writer’s Quote Wednesday : Paulo Coelho

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What more can I say?

The quote very much said who we ought to be … ourselves.

But before Paulo Coelho became a sensation, the very words were told to me by my mom – “que sera sera” and my teachers growing up. Its the words carried through and passed on to young people who cannot wait to see what the world offers, like me once.

Believing in yourself gives you the boost, the confidence, the drive to get what you want and to be who you want to be. We have what it takes to succeed in life, to write and tell a good story, to heal people and to paint color in the grey world.

That is how we should live our lives — believing that we are meant for success and believing that we can achieve it.

The Author:

Not yet a big fan of Paulo Coelho but I know he has cult following that maybe lived through his quotes and books. One day I will get to read one of his book and live it too, but for now I leave you his quote and a little bit more about him.

 Paulo Coelho was born in Brazil and attended a Jesuit school. As a teenager, Coelho wanted to become a writer. Upon telling his mother this, she responded with "My dear, your father is an engineer. He's a logical, reasonable man with a very clear vision of the world. Do you actually know what it means to be a writer?" After researching, which was common for him since he was a policy debater when he was in high school, Coelho concluded that a writer "always wears glasses and never combs his hair" and has a "duty and an obligation never to be understood by his own generation," amongst other things.At 17, Coelho's introversion and opposition to following a traditional path led to his parents committing him to a mental institution from which he escaped three times before being released at the age of 20. Coelho later remarked that "It wasn't that they wanted to hurt me, but they didn't know what to do... They did not do that to destroy me, they did that to save me." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paulo_Coelho

Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote Wednesday : Leo Tolstoy

One of the greatest tragedy when it comes to love – Anna Karenina and one of the greatest author I know Leo Tolstoy. He told his stories that captures you into it, gets you involved and evoke emotions you didn’t know you have.

This story opened my eyes to the realities that one can love for love itself which is a cliche I know especially today in spite of the layers of tragedies Anna brought to herself to fulfill her one desire — to be love. But not according to Tolstoy where the ultimate love is love for families which I think was from his own expression of his loss when he was still young, loosing both his parents in the first ten years of his life. He would have imagined how different life would be if he has both growing up which was I think evident towards the end of his life – by dying alone.

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The author :

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Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (/ˈtlstɔɪ, ˈtɒl/;[1] Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й, pronounced [lʲɛf nʲɪkɐˈlaɪvʲɪtɕ tɐlˈstoj] ( ); 9 September [O.S. 28 August] 1828 – 20 November [O.S. 7 November] 1910), also known as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright and philosopher who primarily wrote novels and short stories. Tolstoy was a master of realistic fiction and is widely considered one of the greatest novelists of all time. He is best known for two long novels, War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877). Tolstoy first achieved literary acclaim in his 20s with his semi-autobiographical trilogy of novels,Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth (1852–1856) and Sevastopol Sketches (1855), based on his experiences in the Crimean War. His fiction output also includes two additional novels, dozens of short stories, and several famous novellas, including The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Family Happiness, and Hadji Murad. In addition to novels and short stories, he also wrote plays and philosophical essays on Christianity, nonviolent resistance, art and pacifism.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Tolstoy

Happy valentines to all!


Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote Wednesday : Books, Love and Affection

Whoever thought of this quote is brilliant. I can really attest to this and I am sure many of you will too. The best time to introduce books is when they are young at the same time the bond between parents grow too — the voice, the cuddling, the embrace and the interactions allows both to appreciate each other and grow in love.

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The connections brought on by books are priceless. I just wish that children and parents will continue to bond and grow in love with books around them.

Happy Wednesday!


Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote Wednesday : On Reading and Traveling

I just have to put this up here and share for this week quote.

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The person in the photo is my friend Jay.

He is working in the third largest TV network in the country. His work and passion in the arts brings him all over the world. An accomplished photographer, journalist and writer with a photo and poetry collection publish in 2010 – Silent Speaks (read review here).

We knew each other for a long time. Although we seldom see each other because of our busy schedules we never lost touch. It’s the kind of friendship that can sustain long distance thanks to social media.  When I saw his post on FB, right there and then I mashed it up and put it here for everyone to meet him and read what he has to say about reading and traveling, which I agree so much.

Have fun reading!


Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you awriters-quote-wed-20151dmire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote Wednesday : J. W. Eagan (Who?)

The tail end of the easterly winds from the Pacific is keeping me in bed wrapped in blanket and wanting to continue sleeping but the chirping of the bed, the noise on the street and the smell of coffee is keeping me awake. So I decided to catch up on my blogging now that my head is clear so are my nostrils and throat. The weather also brought me bad case of allergies that knocked me out for sometime now, even prevented me from blowing the candles on my birthday cake for fear of spreading the virus to everybody partying.

As much as I wanted to keep on writing between sneezing and foggy vision, the brain is not really 100 percent but I managed to catch up on my series and did some other re-runs of my well-loved movies. But now it is so much better — I can now think straight to write and catch up on what I missed, thanks to the e-mail update.

While in on it I like to share this quote that I’ve seen floating in the net and I though well this could be good for this week event — a quote that captures what I always feel when I do the two things that I love doing: reading and watching movies.

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How many movies are based on a novel or from a book adaptation? Almost all the movies shown are based on best-selling books or from stories of people published or not.

How many of you have seen a movie before reading the book or vice-versa?

I try to read the book first when I want to watch the movie shown on the trailer, if I can get my hands on it. LOTR series (J. R. R. Tolkien) is an example of a movie that was spot on, I’ve read the book when I was young and seeing a full length movie at the comfort of a lazy boy was a welcome excitement in my adult life I literally can’t wait to see the next of the series. The same for most historical movies like Pillars of the Earth (Ken Follet) and the crime inspired Melllienium Series (Steig Larson) and children’s well-loved story of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (Roald Dahl). But there are movies that I am wanting to see more or to not stray too much from the original story like the Kite Runner (Khaled Hosseini) or Shogun (James Clavel) where it I know it can be better.

That is why I still prefer to read books, then I can watch the movie adaptation. If I am to watch something without reading the book, that I felt there’s something missing or I felt it’s not well told. I go search for the book and read through it (and watch the movie again) and I get it. There are also stories I like interpreted in films because another persons interpretation of the story gives it a different angle like for example after reading and watching Lovely Bones (Alice Sebold), both medium evoked strong emotional feelings and gives different satisfaction of the ending as well — the movie somehow gave it more human effect when you see it in person than just reading it alone.

It gives me different experience either way and give off different level of satisfaction but at the end of it all its the way the story is told by the author that appeals to me more than anyone else. Interpretation varies so I like to read it from the horse’s mouth so to speak and my imagination can run wild.

So yes, the quote is fitting … never judge a book by its movie unless you read it one or twice over.

Postscript:

If you’re wondering who was the cleaver owner of the quote well nobody knows. I came across this post Who the hell is J. W. Eagan? explaining why we can’t find who exactly is J. W. Eagan but if you have better information let us in on it.


writers-quote-wed-20151Friends if you wish to share your quotes and stories about your love of books and the authors you admire and influence your writing do join us at Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.